You have 4 summaries left

The Ben Shapiro Show

Ep. 1781 - Are They The Baddies?

Fri Aug 04 2023
Donald TrumpSupport BaseValues CleavageMeritocracyForgotten ManLegal Case

Description

The episode explores Donald Trump's support base, the driving force behind history, the concept of the Forgotten Man, the values cleavage in American society, the role of meritocracy, 'limousine liberals' and values traders, and the legal case against Donald Trump.

Insights

Donald Trump's support is not solely based on economic circumstances or class struggle.

His appeal stems from his defiance against the left-wing establishment and his ability to resonate with various demographics.

The current division in America is primarily a struggle between traditional Judeo-Christian values and those who oppose them.

This values cleavage plays a significant role in decision-making and has led to a backlash represented by Trump's presidency.

Elite liberals imposing alternative values on America have fueled the support for Trump.

Many less educated classes rally around him as their best warrior against the educated class and as a defender of traditional values.

The pursuit of justice for marginalized groups has been overshadowed by a desire to destroy the center and make radical changes.

The cultural war, which has evolved rapidly with issues like gender identity, has become a battleground.

The legal case against Donald Trump revolves around whether he believed he lost the election.

Proving this belief is crucial in convincing a DC jury of fraud, but the impact on the 2024 election remains uncertain.

Chapters

  1. Donald Trump's Support Base
  2. The Driving Force Behind History
  3. The Concept of the Forgotten Man
  4. Trump's Support and Values Cleavage
  5. Meritocracy and Values Cleavage
  6. 'Limousine Liberals' and Values Traders
  7. Legal Case Against Donald Trump
Summary
Transcript

Donald Trump's Support Base

00:00 - 06:29

  • Donald Trump draws enormous support from various demographics.
  • Polls show that a majority of voters want to see Donald Trump indicted, regardless of the specific charges.
  • Among independents, there is a difference in approval for indictments related to the 2020 election and classified documents.
  • The strong support for Trump among Republicans stems from their reaction to leftist elites and their values.
  • The appeal of Donald Trump has always been his defiance against the left-wing establishment.
  • Many politicians conflate values-laden issues with economic issues, but history shows that conflicts are not purely about class.
  • World War I debunked the Marxist idea of class revolution.

The Driving Force Behind History

06:06 - 12:40

  • World War I disproved the Marxist idea of a class revolution in Europe.
  • Marxist revolution was not expected to happen in poor countries like Russia.
  • World War I broke out based on nationality, not class conflict.
  • The driving force behind history is community and shared values.
  • Donald Trump's support is not solely based on economic circumstances or class struggle.
  • Investing in gold can protect against the uncertainty of government-driven markets.
  • American society is divided by communities of interest, not just class.
  • Historically, wars have been religious or nationalistic in nature.
  • The real cleavage in American society is a values cleavage, not purely economic.
  • Silicon Valley leaders often live conservative values despite promoting liberal ideas.
  • 'Forgotten Man' refers to the person left behind by politics, typically someone who is poor.

The Concept of the Forgotten Man

12:18 - 18:01

  • The concept of the Forgotten Man is used in politics to refer to the person who is left behind and needs attention.
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt defined the Forgotten Man as the poor person who has been forgotten by society and should be given resources through redistribution.
  • The Democratic party defines the Forgotten Man as a poor person who needs financial support and also needs to be preached about transgenderism and social justice.
  • However, there is another concept of the Forgotten Man introduced by Yale University professor William Graham Sumner in 1876.
  • According to Sumner, the Forgotten Man is someone who works, votes, prays, and always pays. They are often targeted because they hold traditional values that are not valued by others.
  • The current division in America is not primarily based on class conflict but on a struggle between those who believe in traditional Judeo-Christian values and those who oppose them.
  • Culture wars are at the forefront of people's minds because values play a significant role in decision-making.
  • Elite liberals imposing alternative values on America have led to a backlash represented by Trump's presidency.
  • David Brooks explores this idea in his column titled 'What if we're the bad guy?' where he questions why Trump remains politically viable despite his actions.

Trump's Support and Values Cleavage

17:45 - 23:28

  • Donald Trump's poll numbers are stronger against Joe Biden now than at any time in 2020.
  • Republicans support Trump because he embodies their resentment and is seen as the bigot-in-chief.
  • David Brooks suggests that anti-Trumpers may not be the eternal good guys and challenges the narrative of class conflict.
  • The Vietnam War was a values conflict, not solely a class conflict.
  • Authorities imposed busing on working-class areas of Boston but not on upscale communities where they themselves lived.
  • The educated class lives in a separate world from everyone else, contradicting the idea of 'we're all in this together'.
  • David Brooks criticizes the meritocracy and its failure to address spiritual values.

Meritocracy and Values Cleavage

23:03 - 29:03

  • Ripping on meritocracy doesn't solve the problem.
  • There is no alternative to meritocracy that makes economic sense.
  • Promoting meritocracy and promoting liberal left-wing social values are not the same thing.
  • David Brooks conflates credentialism with actual performance.
  • The Asian community in the United States outperforms based on class data.
  • Becoming rich in this country is not limited to a self-perpetuating elite.
  • Elite individuals use language and mores as tools to recognize each other and exclude others.
  • Changing moral norms have had an impact on social mobility, particularly single parenting rates.
  • Elite institutions have become politically progressive because people want to feel good about themselves while participating in exclusive systems.
  • Less educated classes rally around Trump as their best warrior against the educated class, but it's really about attacking traditional Judeo-Christian values and social solidarity.

'Limousine Liberals' and Values Traders

28:34 - 34:44

  • The term 'limousine liberal' refers to individuals who live by a set of values but reject them on a larger scale.
  • There is a belief that people in the working class who vote for capitalism or meritocracy are considered 'class traders'.
  • Thomas Frank's book 'What's the Matter with Kansas?' explores why poor people in Kansas vote Republican despite potential benefits.
  • Values traders are individuals who live one set of values but promote different values to others.
  • There is a disconnect between those living traditional Judeo-Christian values and those living in San Jose and Manhattan.
  • Social solidarity used to be created through shared values, such as attending church together, but this has changed among the elite.
  • Symbols of resistance to liberal elites, like Trump, have become important in politics.
  • The conflict surrounding Ukraine shifted from supporting its defense against Russia to a cultural values conflict, causing some on the right to lose interest.
  • A re-engagement in social solidarity by the liberal elite could help bridge these divides.
  • The pursuit of justice for marginalized groups has been overshadowed by a desire to destroy the center and make radical changes.
  • The cultural war was not started by the right; it has evolved rapidly with issues like gender identity becoming battlegrounds.
  • Attacks on Trump are seen as symbols of tearing down resistance against the regime.

Legal Case Against Donald Trump

34:22 - 41:03

  • The key issue in the Donald Trump legal case is whether he believed he lost the election.
  • If they can prove that Trump believed he lost, it will be easy to convince a DC jury of fraud.
  • The elements of this crime are difficult to fit into civil rights violation, fraud, or obstruction cases.
  • They need to prove that Trump knowingly did these things, which requires getting into his head.
  • Trump's lawyer argues that being told he lost doesn't mean he believed it.
  • There were multiple advisors giving advice in the Oval Office, so disagreement is possible.
  • It will come down to whether Trump pursued a conspiracy knowingly or not.
  • Facilitating and furthering a crime through speech can be prosecuted.
  • A DC jury is likely to be unfavorable for Trump, but the impact on the 2024 election remains uncertain.
1